“'There's cold chicken inside it,' replied the Rat briefly; 'coldtonguecoldhamcoldbeefpickledgherkinssaladfrench
rollscresssandwichespottedmeatgingerbeerlemonadesodawater----'

'O stop, stop,' cried the Mole in ecstacies: 'This is too much!'”
-- from
The Wind in the Willows


Thursday, December 4, 2008

The World That Loved Books • Picture Book

The World That Loved Books
written and illustrated by Stephen Parlato
November • Simply Read Books • Picture Book
"There once was a world where everyone loved books, even the animals. Everyone loved to read so much that when they read their books, they became what they read."
Story: Imagine a world where everyone loves books, and where people become what they read. And then... when the book is done, they become themselves again, only smarter. This is the world Stephen Parlato creates in The World That Loved Books, a world where even the animals love to read. Illustrated with gorgeous, intricately detailed collages, this dazzling picture book conveys a sense of joy and wonder about the natural world. It’s also a powerful fable about reading books and how they change the reader in marvelous and unexpected ways.
Story behind the story: Interviewed by Oprah Winfrey for his unique teaching methods with specially gifted inner city high school students (he works as a counselor with mentally challenged young adults in Baltimore), Stephen Parlato describes his work as “visual puns” with a “double identity of forms”. Images constructed of bits and pieces of the familiar are meticulously rearranged into strange, exotic and marvelous new creatures. Language arts and art teachers will have much to talk about.
FYI: all the review copies for this title have been sent and reviews are in the works; please check back and click on the "comments" link below to read what your colleagues have to say.

46 comments:

webervyn said...

I am trying to request a copy of this book but am unable to because I do not have outlook set up on my computer and because the email is not listed I can not copy and paste it into my hotmail account. Is there any way of getting around this or do I need to figure out how to set up outlook? webervyn6@hotmail.com

Anonymous said...

Send your request to: go@simplyreadbooks.com

Include the following in the subject line: PicnicBasketrequestWorldThatLovedBooks

Good luck,

Julia in Denair

Tiffany said...

The World that Loved Books by Stephen Parlato is fantastically illustrated. The premise is simple--in this world all people and animals love books, and when you read a book, you become the books topic. Therefore, the illustrations are collages, showing a cat made out of mice after the cat read a book about mice. Also, human faces are rendered from angels, birds, snakes, and bugs. The text winds and flows on the page using different fonts to emphasis puns and jokes, but this is a book to be enjoyed through the pictures. Young readers will pour over the pictures. I am already seeing wonderful programming options, like face collages, and telling what different books would turn you into. I give this book a 4 out of 5. I would be sad to go on a picnic without it.

Tiffany Torbeck
Youth Services Librarian
Bloomingdale Public Library
Bloomingdale, Illinois

wisteria said...

Welcome to my world. At least that’s what I thought when I read the beginning of The World That Loved Books, by Stephen Parlato. From the opening page:

“There once was a world where everyone loved books, even the animals. Everyone loved to read so much that when they read their books they became what they read.”

Bravo! This book was so spectacular I read it slowly savoring every memorable morsel of text and the intricate illustrations that honestly should be framed mounted and hung in an art gallery. This author and illustrator understands the importance of providing a simple text with everyday vocabulary. Each couplet with the complementary detailed drawing stand alone, but together they will fascinate students, engage their thinking and stimulate questions and ideas. The book will be enjoyed by all students, whether the student is an auditory or verbal learner, ELL, special needs, gifted and talented or in the mainstream classroom. Mr. Parlato’s text and collages are an oxymoron of simple elaboration.

Once you read this book you will love reading it to your class. You will garner ways to use it in lessons and realize it is an essential part of your classroom library. Anyone who loves books or struggles to get others to read will cherish The World that Loved Books by Stephen Parlato, an exceptionally creative master.

Wisteria Leigh
Media Specialist/Writer
http://www.bookwormsdinner.blogspot.com

wisteria said...

I'm sorry,I forgot to include this part. I would say this book should be a 5 out of 5. The World that Loved Books is so delectable that it calls for a picnic just to read it.

jlarkin said...

Simply put - loved it. As a 7th grade LA teacher and a parent of a toddler - I can definitely see using this book in the classroom and at home!

Loved the packaging, the poster, and the author's personalization in my copy as well!

The collage photos are great and will intrigue all ages - the little ones and my students. As another reviewer said, this could have great ties to an intro to short stories unit OR to a novel unit and my students could have a lot of fun creating their own collages and dialogue lines to explain their love of books.

A 4 out of 5!

Bonnie Langan, Baldwin Boettcher Branch Library said...

#4 Recommend without reservations

This book should be included in every picnic basket involving art, imagination or decoupage crafts.
I was amazed at the use of common everyday items to not only show the subject but the filling of the subject. It reminds you of the reason you enjoy pie so much. Every part goes into it to create the whole pie, which is why it should always be in your picnic basket.
The font is easy to read and the wordage is simple and descriptive. The story is easy to follow and interesting at the same time.
I would use this book to show how creative your decoupage could be. I would challenge my group to be as creative as the book itself. It could be used in the classroom or as a program at the library. The participants could be asked to image what subject they would like to fill with what objects. Or you could start with the same subject, the head, or animal as the author, then fill it with their own items.
You could use a book from the shelves of your library or classroom to give them a specific theme to fill their subject with to create a memory of that special book.
I am working at a Public Library. I love reviewing the books as I am able to see if it would work for a program in the library or have classroom applications. I think children will love this book because of the different items to look for as a project. You could tie it into science, animals, mammals and other classifications.

Mary said...

The World That Loved Books by Stephen Parlato.

Stephen Parlato has created a world where people and animals love books so much that they become what they read. He shows us this world through his amazing collages. A man reading about flowers becomes flowers. The illustration shows a man composed entirely of a wide variety of flowers complete with a rosebud eye.
The illustrations are fabulous. The colors are vibrant. Children will pore over the details in each collage. The collages can be simultaneously beautiful and a bit creepy, such as the illustration of the man who read about insects.
A visit to Stephen Parlota’s website is a must. The address is http://www.stephenparlato.com. The website shows a video clip of a school visit. Schools who bring Stephen Parlota for a visit seem guaranteed a wonderful experience. Parlota and the entire student body create collages on foam board. The completed collages are signed and then framed. Schools can display the completed collages or auction them to raise funds for the school. Art teachers should take note of this book. It provides a perfect tool with which to introduce collage.
My reservation about the book is the strength of the story. Granted, Stephen Parlota is first and foremost an artist. His idea is good but the story seems hastily written.
I rate this book a 2. It provides a wonderful introduction to collage. Children will have fun looking at the pictures, but due to the weak story line I do not feel it is an essential purchase.

Mary Kirk
Media Coordinator
Sherwood Forest Elementary School
Winston-Salem, NC

Mary said...

The World That Loved Books by Stephen Parlato.

Stephen Parlato has created a world where people and animals love books so much that they become what they read. He shows us this world through his amazing collages. A man reading about flowers becomes flowers. The illustration shows a man composed entirely of a wide variety of flowers complete with a rosebud eye.
The illustrations are fabulous. The colors are vibrant. Children will pore over the details in each collage. The collages can be simultaneously beautiful and a bit creepy, such as the illustration of the man who read about insects.
A visit to Stephen Parlota’s website is a must. The address is http://www.stephenparlato.com. The website shows a video clip of a school visit. Schools who bring Stephen Parlota for a visit seem guaranteed a wonderful experience. Parlota and the entire student body create collages on foam board. The completed collages are signed and then framed. Schools can display the completed collages or auction them to raise funds for the school. Art teachers should take note of this book. It provides a perfect tool with which to introduce collage.
My reservation about the book is the strength of the story. Granted, Stephen Parlota is first and foremost an artist. His idea is good but the story seems hastily written.
I rate this book a 2. It provides a wonderful introduction to collage. Children will have fun looking at the pictures, but due to the weak story line I do not feel it is an essential purchase.

Mary Kirk
Media Coordinator
Sherwood Forest Elementary School
Winston-Salem, NC

wordwarrior said...

The World That Loved Books by Stephen Parlato.

I highly reccommend this book by Stephan Parlato. The story line tells a tale of animals and people who become the creatures that they read about in books. The pictures are thought provoking and enjoyable to look at much longer than a traditionally illustrated book. Not only will the students learn about collages while viewing the pages, they will also ponder what they might look like if asked to compare themselves with the books they enjoy reading. I can think of many classroom activities for all ages elementary through highschool using this book. I rate it a 5 out of 5 and give a loud Bravo! to Mr. Parlato!

Anonymous said...

This is a gorgeous book! I thoroughly enjoyed the intricate illustrations (and their vivid colors). The way that the text is shaped added to the experience of the book. The word choices are excellent, and add depth to the reading.

The intriguing idea of people and animals turning into things they read about is great (and obviously the supporting illustrations really get the point across!). Also, the plug for checking books out from the public library in the final pages is a nice nod!

When I received the book, I was very excited to use it in Storytime…unfortunately, it didn’t go over as well as I had hoped. My audience is almost exclusively preschool aged, and they had a hard time interpreting what the larger objects were in several illustrations (particularly the human profiles). The illustration filled with snakes caused a small outburst from one scared young lady, although other listeners were delighted. For some reason, although the text is simple and clear, they had trouble with comprehension- they never fully grasped the concept of one object turning into something else.

I think the book would be excellent in a smaller group, or one-on-one. I would guess that it would also work better with an older audience; I had hoped that since schools were out on holiday break, some older siblings would tag along, but that was not the case.

In the end, one failed Storytime doesn’t doom this book- the charm of the detailed illustrations combined with the straightforward, lyrical text make this book a winner. For collection development, I would Strongly Recommend (5) this book- it is a true wonder! I wouldn’t, however, plan to take it on a preschool Storytime picnic again.

Amanda Ziegler
Youth Librarian
Wichita Falls Public Library

shelburns said...

This is an absolutely beautiful book! I could sit for hours just looking at the pictures as each big picture is a collage of smaller pictures that take time to pick out and enjoy. Imagine a horse made up of fish, or a cat made up of mice, rats, and hamsters. It is truly unbelievable! When I got this book, I was impressed with the cover art, much more so than the picture online did it justice. I can’t wait to give this book to my students and see how they react! Not only are the pictures amazing, but it has a great message. There is not a “plot” to this story, just instances of how people and animals change with each book that they read. I am always telling my students that with books you can go anywhere, become anything or anyone, and learn whatever you want to know. This book solidifies the premise that we become what we read. From each book we read, we take a piece of it with us and carry it around forever. What a great message for kids and adults alike. I will definitely be using this one with my reluctant readers because it is an easy read with a good message. Some children may have a hard time reading it by themselves as the text is not always linear. I like how the author manipulates the text into curves to accent the illustrations. I know that there are a few of my boys that will fall in love with this book strictly because of the illustrations, and if that’s how I hook them, then I’ve got them! I will recommend this to teachers and my librarian for the same reasons: beautiful illustrations, easy read, great message.
I rate The World that Loved Books a 4 - Recommend without Reservation based on the illustrations. I think that children will ask to read it often because of it is short and so that they can see the pictures.

Shelly Burns
Title I Reading Instruction
Willbern Elementary
Houston, TX

Anonymous said...

The World That Loved Books by Stephen Parlato

What a beautiful book! I read this with my seven year old twins and they were mesmerized by the beautiful illustrations. You will find yourself poring over the pictures looking for things you missed the first time; this is a book to be enjoyed over and over again. For anyone who truly loves books, this one was a masterpiece!

Kristen McAloon
Third Grade Teacher
Andover, MN

Linda Neilson said...

The World That Loved Books is a beautiful book. The illustrations are fantastic--you could spend an incredible amount of time on the illustrations alone.

My students (high school special education) are intimidated by words on a page. In this book, the words interact with the illustrations so that they become part of a whole. I'm looking forward to the end of Christmas break so I can get my students' reactions to this book. I'm not sure if the story is enough to hold their interests as a story, but the illustrations will (and to be fair, the book was not written for high schoolers).

I would give it a 4.

Mary Edith Butler said...

The World That Loved Books by Stephen Parlato is a rich, amazingly vivid delight. Its highly detailed and intricate illustrations make this book a bit hard to share with a group, but it is the perfect book to hand to the individual student, especially if the student loves nature, science, and puzzles. I have several students who would feel rewarded if they were able to sit down with this book and study the beautiful, colorful pictures. The author generously included a poster which will be fun to use in the library’s story corner. I do admit I wish the author hadn’t mentioned “fines” at the end—I have worked in several libraries which don’t charge fines. I also would have liked just a touch more text. The book does, however, stir the imagination and would be a great catalyst for collage projects.

Rating 4

Mary Edith Butler
Currently Dean of Communications and Library Services
Todd Library
Waubonsee Community College
Sugar Grove, IL 60554
(a former public school librarian)

Kristen said...

The World that Loved Books by Stephen Parlato

I give this book a 4 out of 5. What a great idea! We definitely become what we read, although not as literally as the characters in this book. The collage illustrations are amazing! I can see fans of the I Spy books poring over them to find every last turtle, butterfly, and angel that makes the rabbit, rhinoceros, and person come alive. I know our art teacher will love to use this with her students as they work on a project that recycles old toys into new sculptures.

Kristen
Pre-School-8th grade Librarian
The Swain School
Allentown, PA

Janet said...

Strongly recommend--this book is a 5! This is a wonderful story about living in a world that loves to read and savors what it reads. As each subject envisions what they are reading, they become a collage of pictures of what they have read.

The illustrations are beautiful and help to emphasize the beauty of reading. When you absorb yourself in a book, you become part of that world.

PLLoggerR said...

Stephen Parlato has used collages to beautifully illustrate The World That Loved Books. The story line--that you become what you read--is a bit thin and repetitious, but the illustrations are likely to draw the "reader" back to the book time after time. That said, several of the folks I've shared this with all felt the illustrations were a bit creepy--slugs and caterpillars for lips, a sea turtle rabbit tail, a cat of mice, etc. At the same time, the illustrations just call out to be looked at and examined to see what can be found.
My rating for this is mixed - a 2 for the text and a 5 or a 3 for the illustrations that will either draw folks back or keep them away! Clearly I have a love / hate relationship with this book and want to share it more than any other book I've reviewed so far!

Becky, Co-Director, Peacham Library

Anonymous said...

The World that Loved Books, by Stephen Parlato, contains a kaleidoscope of pictures that are truly fascinating! Based solely on illustrations, I would rate this book a 4 due to the mesmerizing pictures that are sure to attract students from every background. The concept for the story line is very intriguing (you become what you read) but in reality is skimpy and underdeveloped. Some pages rhyme while other do not. This makes for a reading that is not as smooth as it could be. For these reasons I rate the written part a 2.

Julia Pitau
Denair Charter Academy
Media & Intervention Technician
Denair, CA

alotalot said...

I am going to agree with everything that has been said about this gorgeous book, including Mary’s analysis of it as a “weak story”. I read this book with my grade ¾ class today as part of a unit we are doing on asking questions before/during/after reading. First, this book is just right for this age group. Today I wanted them to write the questions that came to their minds after they heard this book. 5 of them wrote a question dealing with why the author wrote a list instead of a story. We talked about how he is an artist first, so the story might be secondary to the illustrations. They were so impressed with the pictures, however, that they said they love the book. I love the way the illustrations and the text get us thinking from a different perspective. Why, for example, did the rabbit look like a turtle collage instead of simply becoming a rabbit shaped turtle? We also talked about what we might look like if we lived in that world. One boy in my class loves car books, another loves animal books. They liked the idea that their appearance might change as they read books (especially since the horse changed twice!) This was an excellent book to use for a questioning lesson, a writer’s craft lesson, and I can think of 2 art lessons off the top of my head (but I don’t teach art, so I am not going any further with that!)
I rate the book a 4 out of 5.
Lisa
Ontario, Canada
Grade 3/4 teacher

Ellen said...

When I received my copy of The World that Loved Books, I was overwhelmed. The pictures are truly amazing. I could see students looking at them for hours. The colors are brilliant, particularly on the cover. I found myself looking through the book numerous times to see all of the little pictures I missed.
I give the pictures a 5 - they are not to be missed!
The story, unfortunately, left a little to be desired. I showed it to some Children's Literature students and they had difficulty enjoying the plotline of the story. I didn't find the story to be as appealing as the pictures so I have to give the story a 2. The premise is right on, but the wording leaves me wanting. I did appreciate how the words are big and bold so they pop on the page.

ahslibrarian said...

The World that Loved Books is a visual journey into the realm of possibility. In a world where readers become a collage of what they read everything takes on new meaning. The idea is communicated well for readers young and old. In a world fraught with difficulty we need the ability to escape and Parlato has reminded his readers that books have always offered that opportunity. By utilizing common images Parlato also reminds us that visual arts offer the same menu of choices for recreating our present conditions with those sparked by our imagination.

The book stands out as a picture book that children can engage again and again as readers or listeners/viewers. Adults will find it most enjoyable and even useful for sharing in professional development activities that are oriented towards self-discovery. Teachers of all age groups will share and copy the ideas of silhouetted figures and urge their students to create their own defining collage.

Even after the books were closed people were never the same again. That’s the impact we seek as teachers, mentors, artists, and authors. Indeed, it is the influence we all desire for the world. Stephen Parlato understands.

5 of 5

vsp said...

3 out of 5
In these times of little or no funds to make new acquisitions for our school libraries, Stephen Parlato’s The World that Loved Books may not make the “priorities” list. Yet it has valuable features that classroom teachers and teacher-librarians may find quite useful. Parlato’s concept of people and animals living in a world where they “become” what they enjoy reading about is unique and could serve as fodder for some interesting class discussions.

What strikes the reader immediately is the visual appeal of this book. The intricate and colorful photo-style illustrations are wonderful examples of the media of collage. Younger students may try counting or identifying all the different flags, jewels, or species of snakes and birds. Teachers might consider having students create their own collages based on the types of books they like to read. Another possible curriculum connection could be a writing assignment in which students write an account of what their classmates might become based on their reading preferences. For older students, this book provides a natural segue into a biographical research assignment on the life and works of Guiseppe Archimboldo who inspired Parlato.

The World that Loved Books would be a useful addition to libraries where budget cuts have not decimated funding to the point of must-have purchases only.

Vicki Plefka, Elementary Teacher-Librarian
Twin Rivers Unified School District
Sacramento, CA

Allyn Hunt said...

Fantastic! What a treat it was to read and relish The World that Loved Book. I am now having to cautiously watch the art teachers as they lovingly turn the pages and take in all of the beautiful illustrations. One has already requested to use it in her middle school art classes.

The prose flows beautifully with the collages and I cannot wait to incorporate it into my own Language Arts lessons.

Definitely a book you want in your picnic basket.

Five out of five

Allyn Hunt
8th Grade Language Arts
Fort Walton Beach, Florida

Kelly N said...

I just requested a copy of this book and am really excited to see if I can use it as a mentor text with writing workshop!

Jeanette Larson said...

I'm a bit late with the comments but I agree with much of what has been said so won't repeat. The art is amazing and I hope we will see more of Parlato's work in picture books. I love the puns!

Susan Mello said...

The World that Loved Books by Stephen Parlato

This book is a visual feast (even the snakes). I love that the author incorporates the theme of loving books with such stunning pictures. It opens up the idea that anyone even those who learn through pictures can love books. I can see this book used at many levels. I can also see a collaboration between teachers (classroom, art, or library).
As a elementary librarian, I envision many of my students enjoying this book and trying to imitate the concepts. I give it a 5 out of 5.

debnance said...

The World that Loved Books written and illustrated by Stephen Parlato

(The illustrated by is important here; Parlato’s pictures make the text.)

I went to the mailbox one day last week and in the box was a big envelope. My name and address was beautifully splashed across the front. I couldn’t imagine who sent it.

Then I opened the envelope and saw the book inside. Wow. What a book. What book lover wouldn’t adore reading this book over and over and over?! The pictures are intricate collages. The story is of a world where readers become what they read about. Which, of course, is what happens to us. And is the reason why we read.

I’m curious to see what kids will make of this book. I’ve not yet catalogued it and put it out for checkout. I suspect kids will find it as magical and fun and I did. Perhaps I will write more after I try it out with kids.

An astonishingly beautiful and clever book.

5.

Debbie Nance
Librarian
Stevenson Primary School
Alvin, TX

Anonymous said...

Rating: 2 Recommend under certain reading situations

The collage work is intriguing and will interest children of all ages. I could easily lose hours searching for items on each page.

There is a lack of a cohesive storyline. The text is used to set up the illustrations, not to further a story. Near the end, it becomes confusing: "The man who received the book on fish..." and ends suddenly with the horse paying a fine.

Heather
Children's Librarian

Tasses said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
Tasses said...

Sorry for the last deleted post. Hopefully I've got it correct this time!

For my full review of this title, CLICK HERE

Cheryl Tasses
Reading Specialist / Writer, Florida
Picnic Basket Score: 3

Deb Morgan said...

The World That Loved Books-Picture book.
"Coffee Table book for kids"
I used this book with a group of preschoolers. We found the illustrations very interesting and the children took the book after it was read aloud to study it themselves. I'm going to use it with another group to do self collages and also utilize individual pages as we study those subjects:birds, butterflies etc. I do like the concept of exploring the impact of what we read on who we are. I agree though with what was written by others about story strength and instead plan to use the book more as a reference. I'd give it a 4. Thanks for sharing this intriguing book.

Val said...

The World that Loved Books by Stephen Parlato

This book will intrigue readers with its detailed illustrations! I shared this book with my fourth graders, and the students really enjoyed staring and dissecting each collage. When they viewed the collages with snakes and insects, my more squeamish girls reacted with shrieks of horror while my boys thought the pictures were creepy, but cool. This is a book that students will return to over and over again, not so much for the storyline, but for the illustrations! I rate this book a 4 out 5!

Val
Elementary School Teacher
NJ

Tracy O'Brien said...

“There once was a world where everyone loved books, even the animals. Everyone loved to read so much that when they read their books, they became what they read.”

The humans and animals in this story are so enamored with reading, that they share books, buy books, and visit the library to borrow books. The magic in this story, however, lies in the illustrations. Parlato’s collages beautifully capture how the characters become what they read about. While the illustrations mesmerize children as they observe layers of pictures within pictures, the story teaches about the power of imagination that is harnessed during reading. Children will make new discoveries in this book every time they read it. Grown-ups will too.

I strongly recommend this book (5) and suggest visiting Stephen Parlato’s website at http://www.stephenparlato.com/
for more examples of his artwork.

Tracy O'Brien
Achieva Educational Services
St. John's, Newfoundland

Kathy said...

I was really looking forward to receiving this book. I thought the idea for the story was very creative and would lend itself to inspired lessons about reading books for pleasure (rather than for school or homework). While I was amazed by the illustrations, I was disappointed by the text. At times, I thought it was creative but at others, it seemed dull. On some pages, the words rhymed but then on the next page, they did not. I thought the text did not follow any sort of pattern although at times it seemed to suggest that it would. I think most kids and adults would be enthralled by the collage illustrations. Each one is a work of art! However, I had a kindergartener ask to look at the book, which was sitting on my desk; he quickly gave it back to me and said some of the pictures were "weird". Perhaps, it would be better for an older audience. Adding the signed poster from the author was a nice surprise!

I would rate this book a 3 out of 5.

Kathy Farrington
Librarian
Ridge Park Elementary School
Conshohocken, PA

Stacey said...

WOWOW!! What a magnificant book to stimulate--collage--a fun read for all or simply explore a world of books. Stephen Parlato exquisitivly developed a gorgeous book. An autographed poster and personalized book was an added bonus. This book can be used in a variety of ways for teachers, librarians and parents. The art of collage, onamonepea and world play can be the beginning of lessons surrounding this WOW book. I rate this a 5 out of 5...

Stacey Mileti-Worrell
5th/6th Language Arts Teacher
Illinois

Tina's Blog said...

This book has fantastic illustrations that students will pore over....you can look at this book more than once and always find soemthing new. I also think older students will like it because they can "get" the deeper meaning.

Martine Battista said...

Although our school wasn't allowed to receive a copy because another school in our district requested it first, I would still like to post a review. I checked it out from our neighboring school and shared this book with over 300 elementary students (K-5). It was quite a hit! The collages did not scare the youngest as I feared. In fact all ages were enchanted by the illustrations. The word play was appreciated from 2nd graders on up. The 4th and 5th graders were puzzled by the abrupt ending, but still enjoyed it. Students were encouraged to rate the book on a 1 to 5 scale. The average score was 4.1. I'd give it a 3. Although the illustrations were top notch, the story was severely lacking.

Deborah Sloan said...

Just a quick note to say, thank you Martine, for understanding that some publishers are limited with the number of review copies they can send (so some do decide to limit books to one per school or district) and for working with your neighboring school to share the book. That's what this is all about: sharing resources with one another. You got it just right!

Gail said...

This book was a big hit with my sons, who loved the artwork and the idea that you can turn into what you read. I thought the artwork was so inventive--I've long had a set of Guiseppe Archimboldo cards hanging on my wall and this work was obviously modeled after it. I would love to use this with an art class to discuss collage!

Mrs. Kondrick said...

I would have to agree with many of the reviewers. I was impressed with the illustrations, and felt the concept of the book had great promise. The text was a difficult read aloud due to the flow of the words and the story line itself. I read it to my middle school students as their reading response text, and they really used the illustration rather than anything I read to prompt their response. I really appreciate having the book in my collection, and will use it to promote discussion about the collages, however will probably not rely on the text for any lessons.

Dana said...

The illustrations in The World that Loved Books by Stephen Parlato speak for themselves. They are fascinating! The premise of this book is interesting... you become what you read. As a reading teacher, I am always explaining to students that every book they read will shape them as a reader. This book continues to shape readers. Although the text gets a bit repetitive, it would be a great read for a struggling reader, and the illustrations are far from boring! Each illustration is a collage of pictures that captivated the reader's eye. Well done! Definitely a book to recommend to my students!

Dana
Literacy Coach
Chicago Suburbs

Mrs. Vyn said...

I enjoyed reading The World That Loved Books by Stephen Parlato, but do not have many thoughts on how it could be used in the classroom. My 5th graders enjoyed the illustrations. We talked about the fact that when you read books you really become part of the books and the characters in it which is the theme Parlato was using. I would love to make collages like this with my students, but not sure how I can fit it in to my curriculum.
I appreciated the poster and the personalization on the inside cover by the author.

Anonymous said...

As a grade school librarian I appreciate the beautiful illustrations, especially this week with the Caldecott awards being announced. However the story was weak, but I think the appeal of the pictures will appeal to all grades and I plan to introduce it to the early grades when they are in for their reading times.

melching5 said...

First off, I'd like to say thank you for the beautiful poster!
Now, what can I say about the illustrations? They are beautifully done with an element of the fantastic. Because the illustrations are so complex, I can see how Parlato would want to simplify the amount of text and instead select fewer, more powerful words. I enjoyed the use of alliteration, and as a teacher, I am happily adding this book to my toolkit of mini lessons. I do have one wish, and that is for a stronger, more satisfying conclusion.
Because of that one flaw, I am rating this a 4, Recommend without Reservation, instead of a 5, Strongly Recommend.

Renee said...

The art in this book was captivating. I enjoyed reading it myself and will definitely donate it to my library and recommend it to my fellow teachers. I give it a 5.