“'There's cold chicken inside it,' replied the Rat briefly; 'coldtonguecoldhamcoldbeefpickledgherkinssaladfrench
rollscresssandwichespottedmeatgingerbeerlemonadesodawater----'

'O stop, stop,' cried the Mole in ecstacies: 'This is too much!'”
-- from
The Wind in the Willows


Wednesday, May 9, 2012

Bill the Boy Wonder ▪ Nonfiction (illustrated)



BILL:  THE BOY WONDER, THE SECRET CO-CREATOR OF BATMAN
by Marc Tyler Nobleman  illustrated by Ty Templeton
July 2012  Charlesbridge  Ages 8 and up    
This is the true story of how Batman began.
Story:  Every Batman story is marked with the words “Batman created by Bob Kane.” But that isn’t the whole truth. A struggling writer named Bill Finger was involved from the beginning, helping to invent Batman, his foes, and his haunting origins. Bill the Boy Wonder is the first book about the unsung man behind the Dark Knight. With the release of the new Batman movie this summer, this book is sure to be a hit with readers.
The Story Behind the Story: Marc Nobleman explains:  "The last line in the first panel of the first Batman story refers to Batman, but for at least a quarter century, it also applied to the man who wrote it: “His identity remains unknown.”




Until I began to dig, a lot of the little we knew about Bill was thanks to Jerry Bails, the enterprising comics fan and independent publisher who died in 2006. His pivotal 1965 interview, in which Bill explained just how much he’d done at the dawn of Batman, resulted in a fanzine article called “If the Truth Be Known or ‘A Finger in Every Plot!’”

Jerry Robinson, who began working with Bill and Bob shortly after Batman’s debut, said, “[Bill] had more to do with the molding of Batman than Bob. He just did so many things at the beginning, . . . creating almost all the other characters, . . . the whole persona, the whole temper, the . . . origin of Batman.” In another interview, he was even more direct: “Bill Finger deserves co-credit for the creation of Batman, simple as that.”

Bob’s greatest talent may have been the ability to recognize other talent. His greatest flaw may have been the inability to honor that talent. Bill’s greatest flaw may have been the inability to defend his talent. His greatest talent was the ability to forge legends. Simple as that."


Find out more online:

Charlesbridge’s Bill the Boy Wonder page 

Check out the book trailer:




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